How do I find the time difference between two datetime objects in python?

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How do I find the time difference between two datetime objects in python?

How do I tell the time difference in minutes between two datetime objects?

Asked By: Hobhouse

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Answer #1:

>>> import datetime
>>> first_time = datetime.datetime.now()
>>> later_time = datetime.datetime.now()
>>> difference = later_time - first_time
>>> seconds_in_day = 24 * 60 * 60
datetime.timedelta(0, 8, 562000)
>>> divmod(difference.days * seconds_in_day + difference.seconds, 60)
(0, 8)      # 0 minutes, 8 seconds

Subtracting the later time from the first time difference = later_time - first_time creates a datetime object that only holds the difference.
In the example above it is 0 minutes, 8 seconds and 562000 microseconds.

Answered By: SilentGhost

Answer #2:

New at Python 2.7 is the timedelta instance method .total_seconds(). From the Python docs, this is equivalent to (td.microseconds + (td.seconds + td.days * 24 * 3600) * 10**6) / 10**6.

Reference: http://docs.python.org/2/library/datetime.html#datetime.timedelta.total_seconds

>>> import datetime
>>> time1 = datetime.datetime.now()
>>> time2 = datetime.datetime.now() # waited a few minutes before pressing enter
>>> elapsedTime = time2 - time1
>>> elapsedTime
datetime.timedelta(0, 125, 749430)
>>> divmod(elapsedTime.total_seconds(), 60)
(2.0, 5.749430000000004) # divmod returns quotient and remainder
# 2 minutes, 5.74943 seconds
Answered By: Ryan Stanley

Answer #3:

Using datetime example

>>> from datetime import datetime
>>> then = datetime(2012, 3, 5, 23, 8, 15)        # Random date in the past
>>> now  = datetime.now()                         # Now
>>> duration = now - then                         # For build-in functions
>>> duration_in_s = duration.total_seconds()      # Total number of seconds between dates

Duration in years

>>> years = divmod(duration_in_s, 31536000)[0]    # Seconds in a year=365*24*60*60 = 31536000.

Duration in days

>>> days  = duration.days                         # Build-in datetime function
>>> days  = divmod(duration_in_s, 86400)[0]       # Seconds in a day = 86400

Duration in hours

>>> hours = divmod(duration_in_s, 3600)[0]        # Seconds in an hour = 3600

Duration in minutes

>>> minutes = divmod(duration_in_s, 60)[0]        # Seconds in a minute = 60

Duration in seconds

[!] See warning about using duration in seconds in the bottom of this post

>>> seconds = duration.seconds                    # Build-in datetime function
>>> seconds = duration_in_s

Duration in microseconds

[!] See warning about using duration in microseconds in the bottom of this post

>>> microseconds = duration.microseconds          # Build-in datetime function

Total duration between the two dates

>>> days    = divmod(duration_in_s, 86400)        # Get days (without [0]!)
>>> hours   = divmod(days[1], 3600)               # Use remainder of days to calc hours
>>> minutes = divmod(hours[1], 60)                # Use remainder of hours to calc minutes
>>> seconds = divmod(minutes[1], 1)               # Use remainder of minutes to calc seconds
>>> print("Time between dates: %d days, %d hours, %d minutes and %d seconds" % (days[0], hours[0], minutes[0], seconds[0]))

or simply:

>>> print(now - then)

Edit 2019
Since this answer has gained traction, I’ll add a function, which might simplify the usage for some

from datetime import datetime
def getDuration(then, now = datetime.now(), interval = "default"):
    # Returns a duration as specified by variable interval
    # Functions, except totalDuration, returns [quotient, remainder]
    duration = now - then # For build-in functions
    duration_in_s = duration.total_seconds()
    def years():
      return divmod(duration_in_s, 31536000) # Seconds in a year=31536000.
    def days(seconds = None):
      return divmod(seconds if seconds != None else duration_in_s, 86400) # Seconds in a day = 86400
    def hours(seconds = None):
      return divmod(seconds if seconds != None else duration_in_s, 3600) # Seconds in an hour = 3600
    def minutes(seconds = None):
      return divmod(seconds if seconds != None else duration_in_s, 60) # Seconds in a minute = 60
    def seconds(seconds = None):
      if seconds != None:
        return divmod(seconds, 1)
      return duration_in_s
    def totalDuration():
        y = years()
        d = days(y[1]) # Use remainder to calculate next variable
        h = hours(d[1])
        m = minutes(h[1])
        s = seconds(m[1])
        return "Time between dates: {} years, {} days, {} hours, {} minutes and {} seconds".format(int(y[0]), int(d[0]), int(h[0]), int(m[0]), int(s[0]))
    return {
        'years': int(years()[0]),
        'days': int(days()[0]),
        'hours': int(hours()[0]),
        'minutes': int(minutes()[0]),
        'seconds': int(seconds()),
        'default': totalDuration()
    }[interval]
# Example usage
then = datetime(2012, 3, 5, 23, 8, 15)
now = datetime.now()
print(getDuration(then)) # E.g. Time between dates: 7 years, 208 days, 21 hours, 19 minutes and 15 seconds
print(getDuration(then, now, 'years'))      # Prints duration in years
print(getDuration(then, now, 'days'))       #                    days
print(getDuration(then, now, 'hours'))      #                    hours
print(getDuration(then, now, 'minutes'))    #                    minutes
print(getDuration(then, now, 'seconds'))    #                    seconds

Warning: Caveat about built-in .seconds and .microseconds
datetime.seconds and datetime.microseconds are capped to [0,86400) and [0,10^6) respectively.

They should be used carefully if timedelta is bigger than the max returned value.

Examples:

end is 1h and 200?s after start:

>>> start = datetime(2020,12,31,22,0,0,500)
>>> end = datetime(2020,12,31,23,0,0,700)
>>> delta = end - start
>>> delta.microseconds
RESULT: 200
EXPECTED: 3600000200

end is 1d and 1h after start:

>>> start = datetime(2020,12,30,22,0,0)
>>> end = datetime(2020,12,31,23,0,0)
>>> delta = end - start
>>> delta.seconds
RESULT: 3600
EXPECTED: 90000
Answered By: Attaque

Answer #4:

Just subtract one from the other. You get a timedelta object with the difference.

>>> import datetime
>>> d1 = datetime.datetime.now()
>>> d2 = datetime.datetime.now() # after a 5-second or so pause
>>> d2 - d1
datetime.timedelta(0, 5, 203000)

You can convert dd.days, dd.seconds and dd.microseconds to minutes.

Answered By: Vinay Sajip

Answer #5:

If a, b are datetime objects then to find the time difference between them in Python 3:

from datetime import timedelta
time_difference = a - b
time_difference_in_minutes = time_difference / timedelta(minutes=1)

On earlier Python versions:

time_difference_in_minutes = time_difference.total_seconds() / 60

If a, b are naive datetime objects such as returned by datetime.now() then the result may be wrong if the objects represent local time with different UTC offsets e.g., around DST transitions or for past/future dates. More details: Find if 24 hrs have passed between datetimes – Python.

To get reliable results, use UTC time or timezone-aware datetime objects.

Answered By: jfs

Answer #6:

Use divmod:

now = int(time.time()) # epoch seconds
then = now - 90000 # some time in the past
d = divmod(now-then,86400)  # days
h = divmod(d[1],3600)  # hours
m = divmod(h[1],60)  # minutes
s = m[1]  # seconds
print '%d days, %d hours, %d minutes, %d seconds' % (d[0],h[0],m[0],s)
Answered By: tgwaste

Answer #7:

This is how I get the number of hours that elapsed between two datetime.datetime objects:

before = datetime.datetime.now()
after  = datetime.datetime.now()
hours  = math.floor(((after - before).seconds) / 3600)
Answered By: Tony

Answer #8:

To just find the number of days: timedelta has a ‘days’ attribute. You can simply query that.

>>>from datetime import datetime, timedelta
>>>d1 = datetime(2015, 9, 12, 13, 9, 45)
>>>d2 = datetime(2015, 8, 29, 21, 10, 12)
>>>d3 = d1- d2
>>>print d3
13 days, 15:59:33
>>>print d3.days
13
Answered By: griknus17

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