How could I use requests in asyncio?

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Question :

How could I use requests in asyncio?

I want to do parallel http request tasks in asyncio, but I find that python-requests would block the event loop of asyncio. I’ve found aiohttp but it couldn’t provide the service of http request using a http proxy.

So I want to know if there’s a way to do asynchronous http requests with the help of asyncio.

Asked By: flyer

||

Answer #1:

To use requests (or any other blocking libraries) with asyncio, you can use BaseEventLoop.run_in_executor to run a function in another thread and yield from it to get the result. For example:

import asyncio
import requests

@asyncio.coroutine
def main():
    loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
    future1 = loop.run_in_executor(None, requests.get, 'http://www.google.com')
    future2 = loop.run_in_executor(None, requests.get, 'http://www.google.co.uk')
    response1 = yield from future1
    response2 = yield from future2
    print(response1.text)
    print(response2.text)

loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
loop.run_until_complete(main())

This will get both responses in parallel.

With python 3.5 you can use the new await/async syntax:

import asyncio
import requests

async def main():
    loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
    future1 = loop.run_in_executor(None, requests.get, 'http://www.google.com')
    future2 = loop.run_in_executor(None, requests.get, 'http://www.google.co.uk')
    response1 = await future1
    response2 = await future2
    print(response1.text)
    print(response2.text)

loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
loop.run_until_complete(main())

See PEP0492 for more.

Answered By: christian

Answer #2:

aiohttp can be used with HTTP proxy already:

import asyncio
import aiohttp


@asyncio.coroutine
def do_request():
    proxy_url = 'http://localhost:8118'  # your proxy address
    response = yield from aiohttp.request(
        'GET', 'http://google.com',
        proxy=proxy_url,
    )
    return response

loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
loop.run_until_complete(do_request())
Answered By: mindmaster

Answer #3:

The answers above are still using the old Python 3.4 style coroutines. Here is what you would write if you got Python 3.5+.

aiohttp supports http proxy now

import aiohttp
import asyncio

async def fetch(session, url):
    async with session.get(url) as response:
        return await response.text()

async def main():
    urls = [
            'http://python.org',
            'https://google.com',
            'http://yifei.me'
        ]
    tasks = []
    async with aiohttp.ClientSession() as session:
        for url in urls:
            tasks.append(fetch(session, url))
        htmls = await asyncio.gather(*tasks)
        for html in htmls:
            print(html[:100])

if __name__ == '__main__':
    loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
    loop.run_until_complete(main())
Answered By: ospider

Answer #4:

Requests does not currently support asyncio and there are no plans to provide such support. It’s likely that you could implement a custom “Transport Adapter” (as discussed here) that knows how to use asyncio.

If I find myself with some time it’s something I might actually look into, but I can’t promise anything.

Answered By: Lukasa

Answer #5:

There is a good case of async/await loops and threading in an article by Pimin Konstantin Kefaloukos
Easy parallel HTTP requests with Python and asyncio:

To minimize the total completion time, we could increase the size of the thread pool to match the number of requests we have to make. Luckily, this is easy to do as we will see next. The code listing below is an example of how to make twenty asynchronous HTTP requests with a thread pool of twenty worker threads:

# Example 3: asynchronous requests with larger thread pool
import asyncio
import concurrent.futures
import requests

async def main():

    with concurrent.futures.ThreadPoolExecutor(max_workers=20) as executor:

        loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
        futures = [
            loop.run_in_executor(
                executor, 
                requests.get, 
                'http://example.org/'
            )
            for i in range(20)
        ]
        for response in await asyncio.gather(*futures):
            pass


loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
loop.run_until_complete(main())
Answered By: Ilya Rusin

Answer #6:

DISCLAMER: Following code creates different threads for each function.

This might be useful for some of the cases as it is simpler to use. But know that it is not async but gives illusion of async using multiple threads, even though decorator suggests that.

To make any function non blocking, simply copy the decorator and decorate any function with a callback function as parameter. The callback function will receive the data returned from the function.

import asyncio
import requests


def run_async(callback):
    def inner(func):
        def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
            def __exec():
                out = func(*args, **kwargs)
                callback(out)
                return out

            return asyncio.get_event_loop().run_in_executor(None, __exec)

        return wrapper

    return inner


def _callback(*args):
    print(args)


# Must provide a callback function, callback func will be executed after the func completes execution !!
@run_async(_callback)
def get(url):
    return requests.get(url)


get("https://google.com")
print("Non blocking code ran !!")
Answered By: vaskrneup

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